My Wonderful World

W e l c o m e... And Enjoy!

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Butterscotch....YUM!

I love butterscotch flavored anything.   A few weeks ago, I found a great Butterscotch/Pecan Pie recipe from Nestles.  It was a real hit...so yummy! 

 This weekend called for something a little different and all I could think of is Boston Cream Pie....you know, that old standard from back in the 60's.   I believe a couple of vendors even marketed a box mix for Boston Cream Pie.   I never really though of it as a "pie" but more of a filled cake layer, covered with a chocolate glaze.  

My first thing has to be the cake base.   I always have enjoyed Martha Stewart's basic yellow cake recipe.   So easy...great results and a basic standard in my kitchen.  


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Yellow Butter Cake

Cakes

1 cup unsalted butter; room temperature
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour; plus more for pans
1 1/2 cups cake flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 3/4 cups sugar
4 large eggs
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1 1/4 cups milk


Preheat oven to 350F. Butter two 9-by-2-inch round cake pans; line the bottoms with parchment paper. Butter parchment, and dust with flour, tapping out excess; set aside. Into a medium bowl, sift together flours, baking powder, and salt; set aside.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed. Beat in eggs, one at a time, then beat in vanilla. With the mixer on low speed, add the flour mixture in three parts,
alternating with the milk and beginning and ending with the flour; beat until combined after each addition.

Divide batter between the prepared pans, and smooth with an offset spatula.  Bake, rotating the pans halfway through, until cakes are golden brown and a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 30 to 35 minutes.  Transfer pans to a wire rack to cool 20 minutes. Invert cakes onto the  rack; peel off the parchment. Reinvert cakes and let them cool completely,
top sides up.

Notes:  ©Martha Bakes

Yield: 2 9-inch cake


** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.88 **

 
I baked the recipe as written but only used ONE layer.  The second layer heads for the freezer for later use.   I have kept the layer in for about a month, and after thawing, it is just as good as when it came out of the oven.   Handy to have on hand...for a quick dessert.  

My butterscotch filling was just the standard filling.  One egg, 1/4 c brown sugar, two teaspoons cornstarch, pinch of salt  and one cup heavy cream.   Heat until mixture thickens just below boiling.   Remove from heat and add 1 teaspoon vanilla.   A pat of butter stirred in will help preventing a skin.   Cool completely.  


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Butterscotch Ganaché

Frostings

1 c butterscotch chips
1 tb butter; softened
1/3 c heavy cream

In a small bowl, add chips and butter.

Heat cream to boiling in a separate pan.  Pour over butterscotch chips and let sit for 3 minutes.  Whisk until smooth and let cool to thicken.  Pour over cooled cake or dessert.

Chocolate Ganaché can be prepared buy substituting chocolate chips for the butterscotch chips.

Notes:  ©WHStoneman


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Layer ready to split for filling

Butterscotch Filling



Ready for assembly.... and here is the finished Pie!  







Since this was my first version...I would double the butterscotch filling next time.   I love the creamy pastry cream but double the amount would have been better!!  

 

2 comments:

Mary said...

This is a glorious creation. I'm new to your blog, but reading this recipe convinced me to browse through your earlier entries. I really like the food and recipes you feature here. I plan to visit more often. I hope you have a great day. Blessings...Mary

Mr. Bill said...

Thank you Mary..and you must know I am inspired by your contributions also. Love your blog!

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The Fine Art of Cooking involves personal choice. Many preferences, ingredients, and procedures may not be consistent with what you know to be true. As with any recipe, you may find your personal intervention will be necessary -- © WHStoneman 2015